Have you seen photos that tell the story so clearly that you hardly need words? But where do people find them? Then, once the images are found, what’s the best way to keep track of them and their origin?

Here’s a couple of my secrets for finding and editing images that pop off the page.

  1. Purchase and download images from reliable sources
  2. Pictures speak louder than words. Select images that are memorable and relevant to your message.
  3. Maintain your own photo library on your hard drive.
  4. Arrange and catalog images by topic. For example, have a folder of images for each of your top selling destinations, modes of travel (planes, trains and automobiles), etc.
  5. Edit the image name to include the source of the image. For example, “Broadway, NYC – Pixabay”. This tells the entire story and is a quick reference in case there’s any question about the image source. Normally the image is sold with an identifying number. Maintain that in your new image name. 

Bonus: Get creative with image editing tools to add overlays, text and filters when available for your image choice. Free Samples:   We’ve created 40+ cool quotes, travel tips and travel trivia graphics for you to download now!

Beware! Fact or Fib?

“I took a photo of some clients on a recent tour. I can use it anytime, anywhere”

If you said Fib you’re absolutely right! The Supreme Court ruled that people have a reasonable expectation of privacy. If you’re in a public space, you’ve forfeited part of that right to privacy. However, better to be safe than sorry. Having your clients sign a photo release form before they travel with you is a way to protect yourself. I recently did a photo shoot for a new website and had some industry colleagues in the photos. Each of them signed a photo release even though they’re friends and colleagues. It took me about 10 minutes to pull together the form. Here’s an online source. And another.

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